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surviving childhood..... how did we do it? Lock Rss

First, we survived being born to mothers who smoked and/or drank
while they
carried us.

They took aspirin, ate blue cheese dressing, tuna from a can, and
didn't get tested for diabetes.

Then after that trauma, our cots were covered with bright colored
lead-based paints.

We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, doors or cabinets and
when we rode our pushbikes, we had no helmets, not to mention, the risks we
took hitchhiking.

As children, we would ride in cars
with no seat belts or air bags.

Riding in the back of a ute on a warm day was always a special
treat.

We drank water from the
garden hose
and NOT from a bottle!

We shared one soft drink with four friends, from one bottle and NO
ONE
actually died from this.

We ate cupcakes, white bread and real butter and drank
soft drink
with sugar in it, but
we weren't overweight because
WE WERE ALWAYS OUTSIDE PLAYING!

We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were back
when the streetlights came
on..

No one was able to reach us all day.
And we were O.K.

We would spend hours building our go-carts out of scraps and then ride down
the hill, only to find out we forgot the brakes. After running into
the
bushes a few times,
we learned to solve the problem.

We did not have Playstations, Nintendo's, X-boxes, no video games at all, no
99 channels on cable, no video tape movies, no surround sound, no cell phones, no personal computers, no Internet or Internet chat rooms.......WE HAD FRIENDS and we went outside and found them!

We fell out of trees, got cut, broke bones and teeth and there were
no lawsuits from these accidents.

We ate worms and mud pies made from dirt, and the worms did not live
in us forever.

We were given slingshots for our 10th birthdays,
made up games with sticks and tennis balls and although we were told
it would happen, we did not put out very many eyes.

We rode bikes or walked to a friend's house and knocked on the
door
or rang
the bell, or just walked in and talked to them!

Under 12 footy had tryouts and not everyone
made the team. Those who didn't
had to learn to deal with disappointment.
Imagine that!!

The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke the law was unheard
of.
They actually sided with the law!

This generation has produced some of the best risk-takers, problem
solvers
and inventors ever!

The past 50 years have been an
explosion of innovation and new ideas.

We had freedom, failure, success and responsibility, and we learned

HOW TO
DEAL WITH IT ALL!

And YOU are one of them! CONGRATULATIONS!

You might want to share this with others who have had the luck to
grow up
as kids, before the lawyers and the government regulated our lives for
our own good??

Sarah and Kai almost 1year 6 teeth and walking

well Sarah,

I don't want to disagree with you because I'm sure that is how you grew up...

However, not me. smile What an exciting childhood I had...

My mum did drink alcohol while pregnant - but I was no t-totaler either (I had a glass here or there and did while b/fing too), my mum won't eat blue cheese (mould), I don't know what's wrong with tuna from a can (never heard that!) ... not sure what my cot was...

I was ALWAYS made to wear a helmet on my bike (I had a very trendy (not) stack hat!), and I didn't know what hitchhiking was until I was a teenager - by which stage I knew better...

It was law to wear a seat belt when I was a child - and I was made to sit in the backseat til was 8 - mum told me it was law too (still not sure if it used to be).

My mother didn't make cupcakes, wouldn't buy anything white, and would only allow me to drink softdrink on special occasions - she would never buy it unless we were having people over.

I was never allowed to go anywhere that she didn't know where I was - like I had to tell her where I was riding to.

I've never built a billy cart - but I did help dad make things, I never fell out of a tree, broke any bones or teeth (I did fall and hit my head on a towbar - 3 stitches to my forehead).

I don't think I ever ate worms or mud pies, although apparently when I was a toddler I licked a toilet bowl - eeew!


Everyone's different - but yes I agree that we all survive dispite the circumstances. I don't disinfect the floors, I don't constantly wipe Em's hands, I pick up a toy that's gone on the floor and hand it back again (although I didn't give her back dropped dummies). I let her sit on the grass and explore the ground, and she probably eats the odd bug or bit of dirt.

There kids - they are resilliant! More than we give them credit for anyway. I think it's funny because in 20-30 years time they'll probably be saying similar things about how they grew up dispite the circumstances and survived too. smile technology and advances eh?

I love what you have written -
I used to eat flies off the window sill too (YUK!!)
And I remember when mum used to send me to the milk bar on my bike to buy her Winfield cigarettes and she would give me 20 cents to by a big bag of lollies!..... ah the good old days (for the lollies not the cig's)

Mummy to Joe and Maggie

What a cracker - that is an excellent thread Sarah. I was watching the news tonight about that young boy who got badly hurt on a ride-on-mower accident. It reminded me of when we were kids and one of our favourite things. We would wait at the end of our stree for Dad to come home of an afternoon. He would let us three sit on the bonnet of his car while he would drive down the street to our house. At the time it was great fun and he would go pretty fast. Looking back, its kind of scary - a funny scary...

The thing that always gets me when I chat with friends about this kind of stuff is... Imagine what our kids and grandkids are going to be saying about us in 30 plus years. That always puts things into perspective and makes me giggle.

DD is 3yr 8 months - DS is 6 months

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