Parenting

Photographing kids

Photographing kids

As parents we love to capture those moments when our bub is smiling or doing something new or exciting. You can never take too many photos, and digital technology means you can simply delete the ones that haven’t worked out properly. However, it is often impossible to capture them properly simply because bub is usually always on the move! So how can you record precious moments, or take amazing pictures of your little one to keep for posterity?

Practicalities

Firstly you should always have your camera nearby. That way it’s easy to fire off a series of snaps when your bub is doing something. Make sure it’s always fully charged, and that you download the memory card frequently so that there is always room for lots of new photos.

When it comes to taking shots of bub. It’s probably best to do these early in the day when they are refreshed and less likely to be uncooperative. Alternatively, soon after naps or when they have been fed are also good times to do this.

Finally, plan your shots before you take them, and have a clear idea of the type of shot you want to take. It’s worth playing around with the type of angle of shot you want to take as well. Vary it from being a close up shot to a long distance one. That way you can work out what elements you want to incorporate. Professional photographer and expert at children’s photography Gosh Slominski also advises: “Check your shot before you take it and remove unwanted clutter. These often distract from the main focus of your photo, your child.”

Artistic advice

Newborns

If you are photographing a newborn it’s best to do this in natural light if possible. The use of a flash can often be upsetting for them. Gosh suggests: “It’s great to take photos near windows, though preferably without direct sunlight. You can hang a thin white sheet over window to diffuse light. Don’t be afraid to zoom in and take extreme close up shots. Newborns have amazing facial expressions.”

Toddlers

When it comes to the taking of a shot of toddlers, everyone from parents to professionals agree it’s best to capture them on the move! Photograph them when they are doing something love, whether it’s kicking a ball or eating food. They are far more likely to be co-operative that way. Gosh also advises: “get down to the same eye level as your child, that way you won’t overwhelm them. In addition, dressing toddlers in bright colours or costumes is not only fun but also adds to the beauty of the shots you are taking.”

Family group

If you are photographing two or more children it’s usually good to have them dressed in similar colours. Avoid using patterns as they won’t reflect very well in a photo. To occupy them effectively, ask them to do something. This might be as simple as collecting some leaves or sticks, or getting them to run towards you. It’s also useful to remember that a photo that may not be effective in colour may look brilliant in black and white, so don’t be afraid to experiment with this.

The important thing with photography is to keep these sessions as stress free and as much fun as possible. That means some planning and knowing that it is best to keep the sessions short and sweet. All the effort is worth it when you develop them and have those gorgeous pictures framed on the wall.